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CT
(Computed Tomography)

A CT scan is a type of specialist x-ray. The information that comes from an x-ray as they pass through the body is recorded in a series of cross-section pictures or scans. These can be built up into a three-dimensional image of a particular organ of the body. The equipment records the images electronically on a computer.

Photo: Imaging Dept, CRH

CT scans are used to look at areas where no natural contrast of light or shade exists so an injection of a dye, called contrast medium (which usually contains iodine type compound), may be required. This has the effect of creating an artificial contrast, which shows up the area that the Doctor wants to investigate for damage or disease. If the CT scan is of the abdomen of pelvis the patient will be asked to drink something to help contrast the stomach and the rest of the bowel.

Photo: Imaging Dept, CRH

The resulting images...
CT of abdomen

CT Abdomen

CT Reconstructed Image

CT Reconstructed Image

Once we have the basic raw data, the computer can reconstruct anatomy in great detail.

Photos: Imaging Dept, CRH